Movie Review:Shrek Forever After (2010)

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Shrek Forever After 2010tt0892791.jpg poster

  • IMDb page: Shrek Forever After (2010)
  • Rate: 6.5/10 total 40,025 votes 
  • Genre: Animation | Action | Adventure | Comedy | Family | Fantasy
  • Release Date: 21 May 2010 (USA)
  • Runtime: 93 min
  • Budget: $165,000,000(estimated)
  • Gross: $752,600,867(Worldwide)(25 November 2011)
  • Director: Mike Mitchell
  • Stars: Mike Myers, Cameron Diaz and Eddie Murphy
  • Original Music By: Harry Gregson-Williams   
  • Soundtrack: Birthday Bash
  • Sound Mix: Dolby Digital | DTS | SDDS | Sonics-DDP (IMAX version)
  • Plot Keyword: Rumpelstiltskin | Ogre | Shrek | Far Far Away | True Love

Writing Credits By:

    (in alphabetical order)

  • Josh Klausner 
  • Darren Lemke 

Known Trivia

  • The first Shrek movie in RealD-3D and IMAX 3D.
  • The only Shrek film to be presented in the 2.35:1 ratio.
  • The song “Rumpel’s Party Palace”, played during the witch rave scene, is a dance remix of “Fugue in G Minor” by Johann Sebastian Bach. Appropriately for the film’s subject, this song is known as the “Little Fugue”.
  • At the very beginning of the movie, the sign for the trailer park where Rumpelstiltskin lives has the inscription “Abandon all hope ye who enter here”, which is what is said to be on the gates of Hell, according to the English translation of Dante Alighieri’s ‘The Divine Comedy’.
  • As the head of story, Walt Dohrn would perform all the voices during storyboard meetings. No other actors came close to matching the voice he had come up with for Rumpelstiltskin and so he was cast.
  • Rumpelstiltskin appears briefly in Shrek the Third, but looks very different there (wide-brimmed hat, trimmed beard, mustache and sideburns, different facial features) and is voiced by a different actor.
  • The only Shrek movie where Prince Charming is not seen or mentioned.
  • This is not Pied Piper’s first appearance. He also appears briefly in Shrek. He can be seen when Shrek first finds all the fairy tale creatures in his swamp, fluting dozens of rats. He looks very different and is wearing red clothing instead of black.
  • Rumpelstiltskin begins a line with the words “If music has charms to soothe the savage BEAST.” Though this quote has been used many times, it is actually a misquote of the line “Music has charms to soothe a savage BREAST, to soften rocks, or bend a knotted oak,” (from “The Mourning Bride” 1697 by William Congreve). However, in the case of this movie, as it pertains to Shrek (an ogre), the misquote (“beast” rather than “breast”) is, in fact, appropriate.
  • The flute solos played by the Pied Piper we’re played by Jeremy Steig, a well-known jazz flutist. He is also the son of William Steig, the author of the original Shrek books.

Goofs: Plot holes: When Shrek is crying in the woods, the tear is shown falling down his right side. However, when Donkey notices, he is standing to Shrek's left, from which angle the tear is not visible.

Plot: Rumpelstiltskin tricks a mid-life crisis burdened Shrek into allowing himself to be erased from existence and cast in a dark alternate timeline where Rumpel rules supreme. Full summary »  »

Story: A bored and domesticated Shrek pacts with deal-maker Rumpelstiltskin to get back to feeling like a real ogre again, but when he's duped and sent to a twisted version of Far Far Away — where Rumpelstiltskin is king, ogres are hunted, and he and Fiona have never met — he sets out to restore his world and reclaim his true love.Written by IMDb Editors  

Synopsis

Synopsis: The film begins just before Shrek (Mike Myers) rescues Princess Fiona (Cameron Diaz) in the first film. Desperate to lift their daughter’s curse, King Harold (John Cleese) and Queen Lillian (Julie Andrews) meet with con artist Rumpelstiltskin (Walt Dohrn), who requests becoming king of Far Far Away in exchange. Just before the deal is contracted, the king and queen learn that Fiona has already been rescued. In the present, a disgruntled Rumpelstiltskin wishes Shrek was never born and seeks revenge.

Meanwhile, Shrek has grown tired of being a domesticated family man and celebrity among the local villagers, leading him to yearn for the days when he felt like a "real ogre." He takes his family to Far Far Away to celebrate his children’s first birthday where lots of fictional characters are present. Shrek gets annoyed here when the three little pigs eat the kids’ cake. After he lets out a roar of frustration, the entire crowd cheers. He then smashes up a replacement cake and storms off. He meets Rumpelstiltskin, who offers to give Shrek a day to live like a real ogre again in exchange for a day from his childhood he wouldn’t remember being erased. Shrek agrees and signs the contract, and abruptly lands in a world where he is still feared by villagers. He enjoys causing mischief until he finds wanted posters for the ogress Fiona and his home deserted. He is suddenly captured by witches and taken to Rumpelstiltskin, who is now the king of Far Far Away, which has become derelict and uses ogres and even some of Shrek’s friends for slave labor.

Shrek realizes that the day Rumpelstiltskin erased was the day he was born, meaning he never existed in this world before and is unrecognized by everyone he knows. Furthermore, when the day ends, Shrek will fade from existence. Shrek escapes Rumpelstiltskin’s castle with the enslaved Donkey (Eddie Murphy). Initially terrified of Shrek, Donkey decides to trust him after seeing Shrek cry over his lost past, something he had never seen an ogre do before. After Shrek explains the situation, Donkey helps him find a loophole: the contract will be rendered null and void if Shrek and Fiona share true love’s kiss before the day ends. Shrek and Donkey suddenly encounter a band of ogres who have formed a resistance against Rumpelstiltskin. These ogres are led by Fiona, who is still cursed after escaping from the tower where she was held captive, and additionally keeps the retired and overweight Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas) as a pet.

Shrek does everything he can to gain Fiona’s love, but she is too busy preparing an ambush on Rumpelstiltskin during his nightly ogre hunt. However, the ogres are caught in a trap instead and captured. Shrek insists Fiona kiss him, saying it will fix everything, but because Fiona doesn’t love him, it is ineffective. Upon hearing that Rumpelstiltskin is offering anything desired by the one who captures Shrek with no strings attached, Shrek turns himself in exchange for all ogres being released, but Fiona remains in custody because she is only an ogre by night due to her curse (i.e., not "all ogre"). Shrek and Fiona are set to be fed to Dragon, but Donkey, Puss and the ogres raid Rumpelstiltskin’s castle, allowing Shrek and Fiona to subdue both Dragon and Rumpelstiltskin.

As the sun begins to rise, Shrek begins to fade from existence, but Fiona, having fallen in love with him all over again, kisses him just before he disappears completely, which nullifies the contract and restores Shrek to his world just before he originally lashed out at everyone. Shrek embraces his friends and family with newfound appreciation for everything he has, truly living happily forever after.

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • Andrew Adamson known as executive producer
  • Teresa Cheng known as producer
  • Gina Shay known as producer
  • Aron Warner known as executive producer
  • John H. Williams known as executive producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Mike Myers known as Shrek (voice)
  • Eddie Murphy known as Donkey (voice)
  • Cameron Diaz known as Princess Fiona (voice)
  • Antonio Banderas known as Puss in Boots (voice)
  • Julie Andrews known as Queen (voice)
  • Jon Hamm known as Brogan (voice)
  • John Cleese known as King Harold (voice)
  • Craig Robinson known as Cookie (voice)
  • Walt Dohrn known as Rumpelstiltskin / Priest / Krekraw Ogre (voice)
  • Jane Lynch known as Gretched (voice)
  • Lake Bell known as Patrol Witch / Wagon Witch #2 (voice)
  • Kathy Griffin known as Dancing Witch / Wagon Witch #1 (voice)
  • Mary Kay Place known as Guard Witch (voice)
  • Kristen Schaal known as Pumpkin Witch / Palace Witch (voice)
  • Meredith Vieira known as Broomsy Witch (voice)
  • Ryan Seacrest known as Father of Butter Pants (voice)
  • Cody Cameron known as Pinocchio / Three Pigs (voice)
  • Larry King known as Doris (voice)
  • Regis Philbin known as Mabel (voice)
  • Christopher Knights known as Blind Mice (voice)
  • Conrad Vernon known as Gingerbread Man (voice)
  • Aron Warner known as Wolf (voice)
  • Jasper Johannes Andrews known as Ogre Baby (voice)
  • Ollie Mitchell known as Ogre Baby (voice)
  • Miles Christopher Bakshi known as Ogre Baby / Villager Kid (voice)
  • Nina Zoe Bakshi known as Ogre Baby / Tourist Girl / Villager Girl (voice)
  • Billie Hayes known as Cackling Witch (voice)
  • Jeremy Hollingworth known as Villager Fan #1 (voice)
  • Brian Hopkins known as Villager Fan #3 / Ogre Gnimrach (voice)
  • Chris Miller known as Royal Messenger / Magic Mirror / Geppetto (voice)
  • Mike Mitchell known as Tour Guide / Camp Ogre / Ogre Naysayer / Baba Witch / Melty Witch / Witch Guard #2 / Butter Pants (voice)
  • James Ryan known as Villager Fan #2 (voice)
  • Ashley Boettcher known as (voice)
  • Danielle Soibelman known as (voice)
  • Frank Welker known as Dragon / Animals (voice) (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Art Department:

  • Rejean Bourdages known as storyboard artist
  • Paul Duncan known as visual development artist
  • Paul Fisher known as storyboard artist
  • Daniel Hashimoto known as visual development
  • Steve Hickner known as additional storyboard artist
  • Brandon Holmes known as art production assistant
  • Jorgen Klubien known as storyboard artist
  • Jonathan B. Lee known as research assistant
  • Peter Maynez known as visual development artist
  • Chris Reccardi known as storyboard artist
  • Caprice Ann Ridgeway known as art researcher
  • William T. Silvers Jr. known as matte painter
  • Christopher Vigil known as art coordinator
  • J.J. Villard known as visual development artist
  • Anthony Zierhut known as storyboard artist

..

 

Companies

Production Companies:

  • DreamWorks Animation
  • Pacific Data Images (PDI)

Other Companies:

  • DGC Records  soundtrack
  • Digital Media Services (DMS)  digital marketing asset management
  • Eastwood (Sound and Vision)  additional Pro Tools Systems supplied by (foreign versions)
  • Varèse Sarabande  score album
  • yU+Co.  main titles

Distributors:

  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (USA) (theatrical)
  • IMAX (2010) (worldwide) (theatrical) (IMAX version)
  • Paramount Japan (2010) (Japan) (theatrical) (as Paramount Pictures Japan)
  • Paramount Pictures Entertainment (2010) (Canada) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (Australia) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (France) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (UK) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (Ireland) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (New Zealand) (theatrical)
  • Solar Entertainment (2010) (Philippines) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Argentina) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Denmark) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Greece) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Philippines) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Sweden) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Singapore) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2010) (Belgium) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2010) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • Zon Lusomundo Audiovisuais (2010) (Portugal) (theatrical)
  • FX Network (2012) (USA) (TV)
  • Film1 (2011) (Netherlands) (TV) (limited)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Netherlands) (DVD)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Netherlands) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Sweden) (DVD)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Sweden) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (USA) (DVD)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)

..

 

Other Stuff

Visual Effects by:

  • Evrim Akyilmaz known as visual effects
  • Manuel Almela known as modeler
  • William E. Arias known as lead lighter
  • Shinsaku Arima known as visual effects
  • Mira Arte known as character effects animator
  • Ricky Baba known as surfacing artist
  • Jasper M. Baltzersen known as paint fix artist: PDI/DreamWorks
  • Kelly Barschig known as recruiter: DWA
  • Michael Baula known as paint fix artist: PDI/DreamWorks
  • David Bazelon known as crowds artist
  • Matthew Beightol known as paint fix artist
  • Ken Bielenberg known as visual consultant
  • Herve Bizira known as technical director
  • Silviu Borac known as senior fx r&d engineer
  • Scott Brisbane known as matte painter
  • Max Bruce known as lighting artist
  • Jeff Budsberg known as visual effects
  • Craig Cannon known as paint fix artist: PDI/DreamWorks
  • Jessica Canter known as surfacing artist
  • Justin Carcasole known as lighting technical director
  • Mark T. Carlson known as effects engineer
  • Gregg Carrier known as software engineer
  • Merlin Carroll known as rotoscope artist
  • Jason Carter known as layout artist
  • Min-Yu Chang known as CG modeler: PDI DreamWorks
  • Chloe Chao known as research and development
  • An-Lon Chen known as crowds technical director
  • Yiqun Chen known as character effects: Dreamworks
  • Wes Chilton known as visual effects
  • Joong-ryang Choi known as character effects artist
  • Sebastien Chort known as lead lighting artist
  • James Cockerham known as character technical director (as Mitch Cockerham)
  • Shaun Collaco known as lead lighting and compositing artist: Dreamworks Animation
  • Clint Colver known as lighting artist
  • Lisa Slates Connors known as surfacing supervisor
  • Doug Cooper known as visual effects supervisor
  • Christian Cunningham known as lighting artist
  • Kwesi Davis known as production engineer
  • Gilbert Davoud known as global character technical director
  • Christina N. de Juan known as character technical director
  • Barry Dempsey known as surfacing/lighting technical director
  • Caine Dickinson known as lighter: DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Nathaniel Dirksen known as character technical director
  • Justin Dobies known as lighting technical assistant
  • Sandy Dong known as surfacing artist
  • Christopher Lynn Edwards known as lighting technical artist
  • Avedis Ekmekjian known as lighter
  • Christopher Ell known as final layout artist
  • Erin J. Elliott known as crowds artist
  • Valentina Ercolani known as character technical director
  • Cassandra Fanning known as digital artist
  • Michael Farley known as digital effects
  • David V. Fedele known as lead character effects artist: Dreamworks
  • Oliver Finkelde known as head of character effects: DreamWorks
  • Angela Ensele Firebaugh known as modeler
  • Crystal Fong known as surfacing technical director
  • Mariana Galindo known as character effects animator
  • Akash Garg known as fx engineer
  • Jonathan Gibbs known as global lead
  • Greg Gibson known as systems administrator
  • Shane Glading known as lighting artist
  • Dan Golembeski known as lead technical director
  • Darin K. Grant known as head of production technology
  • Bill Gumina known as paint fix artist
  • Glen Gustafson known as lighter
  • Lei Han known as lighting artist
  • Katy Harrison known as production testing technical director
  • Andy Hayes known as visual effects artist
  • Stephen Heidelberg known as character effects artist
  • Corey Hels known as rough layout artist: DreamWorks Animation
  • Sean Hoessli known as visual effects production manager: Yuco
  • Robert Holder known as lighter: DreamWorks
  • Joe Hughes known as character effects animator
  • John Hughes known as visual effects artist: Dreamworks
  • Michael Scott Hutchinson known as character technical director
  • Lok Ming Hwa known as lighting artist
  • T.J. Jackson known as effects technical director
  • Aaron James McComas known as effects animator
  • Lucas Janin known as effects developer
  • Jeffrey 'JJ' Jay known as character technical director supervisor
  • Gregory Jennings known as lighter
  • Patrick Jensen known as matte painter
  • Yong Duk Jhun known as head of layout
  • Ardie Johnson known as character modeler
  • Amanda Johnstone-Batt known as lighter (as Amanda Johnstone)
  • Michael Cadwallader Jones known as visual effects animator (as Michael Jones)
  • Kurt Kaminski known as lighter
  • Sandy Kao known as character technical director supervisor
  • David S. Karoll known as surfacing artist
  • Michelle Kater known as paint fix artist
  • Blaine Kennison known as lighter
  • Farid Khadiri-Yazami known as lighting & compositing
  • Andrew Young Kim known as visual effects lead
  • Soo Kyung Kim known as lighter & compositor
  • Stephen Krauth known as lead technical director
  • Li-Lian Ku known as character technical director
  • Linda Kurgpold known as surfacing artist
  • Amy Sun Kwa known as technical director
  • Josh LaBrot known as layout artist
  • Ken Lam known as lighting and compositing technical director
  • Donna Lanasa known as lighting/compositing
  • Jennifer Lasrado known as visual effects artist
  • David C. Lawson known as lead lighter
  • Daniel Khin Lay known as character effects artist
  • Domin Lee known as visual effects
  • Erin Lehmkühl known as digital effects artist
  • Jim Leuper known as effects engineer
  • Greg Lev known as CG supervisor
  • Lyndon Li known as lighting artist
  • Benjamin Lishka known as lead lighter
  • Fabio Lissi known as production engineer
  • Kieron Cheuk-Chi Lo known as lighting artist
  • Michael Losure known as visual effects
  • Marc Machuca known as paint fix artist
  • Michael Manza known as lead lighter: DreamWorks Animation
  • Pietro Materossi known as lighter
  • Paul McGhee known as digital intermediate color timer: Dreamworks Animation
  • Steve McGrath known as modeler
  • M. Scott McKee known as lead lighting artist
  • Phil 'Captain 3D' McNally known as stereoscopic supervisor
  • Zeki Melek known as visual effects
  • Gustav Melich known as visual effects artist
  • Candice Miller known as character technical director
  • Marc Miller known as lighting artist
  • Tom Molet known as global character technical director
  • Taylor Moll known as surfacing artist
  • Cesar Alejandro Montero Orozco known as surfacing artist
  • Jonathan Fletcher Moore known as lighting artist
  • Melissa D. Moss known as paint fix artist
  • Ken Museth known as principle engineer
  • Ori Neidich known as media tools & post-production technology engineer
  • Jennifer Stephenson Newlin known as surfacer
  • Mark Newport known as visual effects artist
  • Rob Nitsch known as character effects developer
  • Alex Ongaro known as head of effects
  • Patrick A. Palmer known as production engineer
  • Joyce Pan known as lighting technical director
  • Michael J. Pan known as production engineer
  • Rupali Parekh known as lighting artist
  • Luca Pataracchia known as effects animator
  • Kartik Rajul Patel known as roto lead
  • Pranay Patel known as lighting technical director
  • Nikita Pavlov known as visual effects
  • Andrew Pearce known as director of reseach and development
  • Alessandro Pepe known as visual effects artist
  • Steve Petterborg known as lighting technical director
  • Navin Pinto known as character effects artist: Dreamworks Animation
  • Jason Pomerantz known as senior digital artist (IMAX Version)
  • Jason Porath known as effects animator
  • Abhik Pramanik known as fx engineer
  • Tsun-Hui Andrea Pun known as surfacing artist
  • Andrew Pungprakearti known as digital effects artist
  • Gene Ragan known as technical lead
  • Jeff Ranasinghe known as lighting and compositing artist
  • John P. Rand known as lead modeler
  • Brian Ratchford known as surfacing artist
  • Scott Raymond known as crowd animator
  • Joshua F. Richards known as crowds developer
  • Hayyim Sanchez known as surfacer
  • Paul Schoeni known as modeler
  • Marc Scott known as cg supervisor
  • Armando Sepulveda known as modeler
  • Priyes Shah known as senior lighting artist
  • Gaurav Shenai known as character technical director
  • Avdesh Shukla known as lead compositor
  • Nitin Singh known as post production coordinator
  • Rahul Singh known as effects technical director
  • Marty Sixkiller known as media tools supervisor
  • Javier Solsona known as character technical director
  • Young Song known as surfacer
  • Steven Sorensen known as layout artist
  • Ilia Standish known as character effects technical director
  • Brock J. Stearn known as lighter
  • Allen Stetson known as crowds supervisor
  • Jeff Sullivan known as crowds artist
  • Joe Ark Sun known as character effects artist
  • Kenji Sweeney known as additional lighting and compositing artist
  • Osamu Takehiro known as lighter
  • Britton Taylor known as digital effects artist
  • Don Taylor known as lead lighter
  • Panat Thamrongsombutsakul known as character effects
  • Nigel W. Tierney known as surfacing technical director
  • Anthony Tyler known as character effects technical director
  • Ozgur Ustundag known as lead lighting artist
  • Mauricio Valderrama known as stereo paint fix artist
  • Loren Van Wiel known as digital artist
  • Benjamin Venancie known as lighting artist
  • Brent Villalobos known as production engineer
  • Michael Leon Ware known as character technical director
  • Daniel Warom known as crowds artist: Dreamworks
  • Gina Warr known as lead lighting artist
  • Jason P. Weber known as character effects animator
  • Eugene Wen known as lighting technical assistant
  • Joshua West known as modeling supervisor
  • Rhiannon Leffanta Wilhelmi known as layout artist
  • Ron Williams known as character effects animator
  • Hock Wong known as character effects artist
  • Laura Wood known as production engineer
  • Zhang Xiao known as visual effects
  • Neil Yamamoto known as character effects
  • Doug Yoshida known as lighter
  • Masahito Yoshioka known as visual effects
  • Can Yuksel known as visual effects
  • Phil Zucco known as modeler
  • Uma Havaligi known as character effects animator (uncredited)
  • Fangwei Lee known as visual effects (uncredited)
  • Tom Piedmont known as rotoscoper: Yu+Co (uncredited)
  • Paul Rivera known as matte artist (uncredited)
  • Mark Sandell known as surfacing technical director (uncredited)
  • Curt Stewart known as crowds artist (uncredited)

Release Date:

  • USA 21 April 2010 (Tribeca Film Festival)
  • USA 16 May 2010 (Universal City, California) (premiere)
  • Malaysia 20 May 2010
  • Philippines 20 May 2010
  • Russia 20 May 2010
  • Singapore 20 May 2010
  • Ukraine 20 May 2010
  • Canada 21 May 2010
  • Georgia 21 May 2010
  • Indonesia 21 May 2010
  • Kazakhstan 21 May 2010
  • Taiwan 21 May 2010
  • USA 21 May 2010
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina 27 May 2010
  • Kuwait 27 May 2010
  • Slovenia 27 May 2010
  • Turkey 28 May 2010
  • Egypt 2 June 2010
  • Estonia 4 June 2010
  • Lithuania 4 June 2010
  • Syria 10 June 2010
  • Romania 16 June 2010
  • Australia 17 June 2010
  • France 30 June 2010
  • Germany 30 June 2010
  • Switzerland 30 June 2010 (French speaking region)
  • Austria 1 July 2010
  • Hong Kong 1 July 2010
  • Israel 1 July 2010
  • South Korea 1 July 2010
  • Ireland 2 July 2010
  • UK 2 July 2010
  • Argentina 6 July 2010 (Buenos Aires) (premiere)
  • Panama 7 July 2010
  • Spain 7 July 2010
  • Sweden 7 July 2010
  • Switzerland 7 July 2010 (German speaking region)
  • Argentina 8 July 2010
  • Denmark 8 July 2010
  • Hungary 8 July 2010
  • Netherlands 8 July 2010
  • Peru 8 July 2010
  • Portugal 8 July 2010
  • Brazil 9 July 2010
  • Colombia 9 July 2010
  • Finland 9 July 2010
  • Norway 9 July 2010
  • Poland 9 July 2010
  • Belgium 14 July 2010
  • Bulgaria 16 July 2010
  • Iceland 16 July 2010
  • Mexico 16 July 2010
  • Greece 19 August 2010
  • Italy 25 August 2010
  • Japan 28 October 2010 (Tokyo International Film Festival)
  • Japan 18 December 2010

Followed or Connected by:

Scared Shrekless (2010) (TV)

Spin off

Shrek Forever After: The Game (2010) (VG)
Puss in Boots (2011)

References

The Wizard of Oz (1939)
 -  When rumple throws water on a witch, she melts saying "what a world, what a world".
Deliverance (1972)
 -  While the king and queen travel through the bad neighborhood,dueling banjos is heard in the background
Coming to America (1988)
 -  Donkey sings "The Greatest Love of All," for the witches. Eddie Murphy did the same in this film, as well.
Back to the Future Part II (1989)
 -  Rumpelstiltskin steps off the balcony on to his goose which his followers don't know is there, much like Marty steps onto the DeLorean from the top of the building to escape from Biff.
Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990)
 -  The melting witch screams ''What a world, what a world'' just like the witch-hat wearing gremlin near the end of the movie.
Groundhog Day (1993)
 -  After Fiona makes her wish, Shrek experiences many days who all are almost identical, similar to the plot in Groundhog Day
Finding Nemo (2003)
 -  "Half empty? I'd say it's half full."
The Incredibles (2004)
 -  When Rumpeltstiltskin wears his angry wig, he looks like Syndrome without the mask.

Referenced in

"RTL Boulevard: Episode #10.170" (2010)
 -  Carlo Boszhard talks about the voiceover for Donkey in the Dutch translation
"The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #18.48" (2010)
 -  Jay mentions that Landon Pigg and Lucy Schwartz's song "Darling I Do" is from the film's soundtrack
"The Rotten Tomatoes Show: Robin Hood/Letters to Juliet/Just Wright (#2.17)" (2010)
 -  Brett and Ellen say they plan to review this movie in the next episode
"Who Wants to Be a Millionaire: Episode #9.5" (2010)
 -  Included in a $500 question
"Special Collector's Edition: Hook (#1.15)" (2010)
 -  Appears on the list of DVD releases of November/December.
"Conan: A Quantum of Kwanzaa (#1.26)" (2010)
 -  Announcer and actress Kristen Schaal (while being interviewed by Conan O'Brien) mentions this movie
"Conan: Houston, We Have a Murder (#1.33)" (2011)
 -  Conan O'Brien introduces actress Cameron Diez and mentions this movie
The Greatest Movie Ever Sold (2011)
 -  Billboard sign of the movie.
"Mad: KoBee Movie/Law and Ogre (#1.20)" (2011)
 -  Shrek mentions Rumpelstiltskin giving him a new life as a crime fighter.

Featured in

"Late Show with David Letterman: Eddie Murphy/Kaley Cuoco/Jakob Dylan (#17.121)" (2010)
 -  Promotional excerpt shown during interview with Eddie Murphy – Donkey get's caught in a waffle trap.
"Late Show with David Letterman: Mike Myers/Tom Dreesen (#17.138)" (2010)
 -  Promotional excerpt showed during interview with Mike Myers – Shrek tries to convince Donkey that they are friends, with a song.
"Wheel of Fortune: Dads & Grads 1 (#27.176)" (2010)
 -  Clip shown with promotional prize wedge on the wheel
"The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #18.56" (2010)
 -  a clip from the film starring Eddie Murphy is shown
"At the Movies: Episode #7.19" (2010)
 -  Clips shown when this movie is reviewed.
"That Fellow in the Coat: A Look Back at the Animated Features of 2010 (#6.19)" (2010)
 -  Clips shown.
"The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #19.71" (2011)
 -  a clip is included in a montage of Cameron Diaz films

Spoofs

The Wizard of Oz (1939)
 -  All the witches bear some resemblance to the Wicked Witch, and share her vulnerability to water.
It's a Wonderful Life (1946)
 -  Shrek wishes to have one day from his early childhood, a day he doesn't remember, be taken away from him. That day turns out to be the day he was born. Like George Bailey, Shrek learns what the world would be like had he not been born.
Deliverance (1972)
 -  A bar of "Dueling Banjoes" can be heard as the King & Queen go to visit Rumpelstiltskin.
The Untouchables (1987)
 -  Rumpelstiltskin eliminates -although in a funny way- one of his witches henchmen while walking around a table where they are all sitting at, after having pronounced a speech about optimism and the importance of teamwork; just as Al Capone does in the unfamous baseball bat scene.
Charlie's Angels (2000)
 -  While Fiona dances to disco, she does an aerial move and gracefully falls down in slow-motion; almost identically performed by Cameron Diaz in this movie.
Spider-Man (2002)
 -  Witches use apples as bombs, like The Green Goblin uses pumpkins as bombs.

MPAA: Rated PG for mild action, some rude humor and brief language

..

 
 

Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database

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10 Responses Review Shrek Forever After (2010)

  1. I saw "Shrek Forever After" on special screenings and I really hoped it
    would live up to the first 2 films. But at the end of the day, it
    wasn't as good or magical. I kind of felt disappointed because even
    though the Third Installment was bad I was hoping they went back and
    recognize their mistakes. But this movie does have its strong points,
    it was quite funny and entertaining. There were moments in there that
    felt like the first two films, and overall it is a very enjoyable ride
    that even though it doesn't live quite up to the first two films. It is
    worth your money just to have fun with it.

    7.2/10 I'd recommend people to see this film, but don't go in it with
    HIGH expectations.

  2. After three films of diminishing quality, more than anything, Shrek
    Forever After begs the obvious question: why? Unfortunately the answer
    is also all too obvious with the franchise having grossed one billion
    dollars domestically and oodles more overseas. For what it's worth,
    this instalment is better than the last but fails to hold a candle to
    Shrek 2 and pales to the point of apparition when compared to the
    original.

    The characters that populate the "Shrek" universe remain as endearing
    as ever in principle, but after four movies there is little that can be
    done to keep them animated, so to speak. That is why it comes as no
    surprise that the plot of this film has the mythical land of Far Far
    Away being turned on its head by the devious Rumplestiltskin, morphing
    all familiarity into a bizzaro world of sort, and I'll admit, it does
    add an iota of charm to the proceedings. Shrek (Mike Myers) finds
    himself tired of family life with his ogre wife Fiona (Cameron Diaz)
    and longs for his bachelor days of terrifying townsfolk and signs a
    contract with 'Rumple' as he is less than affectionately called. Things
    don't turn out nearly as he imagined and Shrek must fulfil a loophole
    in the contract to turn things back to the way they were.

    The original gang all return along with Shrek and Fiona. We have the
    swashbuckling Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas), the chatty Donkey
    (Eddie Murphy) and Julie Andrews and John Cleese as the Queen and King
    respectively. There are also a number of celebrity voice cameos
    including Larry King and Regis Philbin and all add up to a lively time
    at the movies. In the movies defence, the lack of freshness never
    translates to boredom.

    The biggest issue with Shrek the Third was the weak attempt to inflate
    the voice cast, making things more monotonous yet. DreamWorks has
    clearly learned from this mistake and in addition to tweaking the
    familiar character's personas in this alternate reality, find a decent
    villain in Rumplestiltskin (Walt Dohrn) along with great comedians the
    likes of Craig Robinson and Jane Lynch. The animation is as stellar as
    ever and it never ceases to amaze how lifelike a film can look that has
    a talking donkey at its center.

    What makes this descendant of Shrek somewhat distinguishable is that it
    presents itself more as homage then adhering to the spoof ideology that
    characterized the others. Shrek Forever After is part Aladdin, part
    Bedazzled and more than a sprinkle of It's a Wonderful Life. There are
    also many more laughs in this film than the previous, and can often be
    attributed to site gags sprung from the new universe (an obese Puss in
    Boots provokes more than a few guffaws).

    What everyone has to remember, first and foremost, is that the "Shrek"
    franchise is meant for children and I don't believe any of the four
    instalments could disappoint an eight year old. It is the accompanying
    adults that need to be wary of the growing tedium in the franchise, but
    thanks to a plethora of talented actors and a significantly more
    satisfying storyline, Shrek Forever After makes for an entertaining
    diversion, even if it's no longer magical.

  3. When I found out that a fourth Shrek movie was being made, it made me
    frown because it seemed pretty needless, especially that the last movie
    was such a bore. But then again, if you take the storyline into
    consideration, this becomes a fitting final chapter to formally close
    the Shrek series. The movie is originally entitled SHREK FOREVER AFTER,
    but in other regions of the world including ours, it is entitled SHREK:
    THE FINAL CHAPTER, so it's obvious.

    First we go to the more unpleasant aspects; this movie works more as a
    fantasy-adventure movie rather than a comedy. That's because the humor
    factor of Shrek has gone old already. This movie seems to squeeze the
    very last drop of what is left of the Shrek series' dried out desert of
    humor. Sure, it may make us give out a chuckle here, a chuckle there,
    but this Shrek movie cannot make us laugh out loud anymore. When you
    look back at its title "Shrek the Final Chapter" you would realize that
    this movie does seem to apologize with the fact that this'll be the
    last and probably an admission that they could not squeeze any more
    decent thing out of the Shrek saga after this one; it's a final effort
    to make one last buck.

    On the other hand, Shrek's main story aspect is a little more
    interesting than its humor. As I said earlier, this movie is better as
    a fantasy adventure because we do get to see an alternate reality where
    Shrek is back into being an outcast Ogre and everybody else who was
    originally part of his circle of friends has not met him yet.
    Eventually, they get into an adventure wherein he must face a new
    enemy, a new problem, and he even gets to meet other ogres and an ogre
    resistance army that pretty much reminded me of Warcraft (the
    old-school Warcraft 2 to be exact). In this bizarro world, Donkey has
    not met him, Puss has become obese, and Fiona is the leader of the Ogre
    resistance. Shrek must go through this alternate universe and survive
    it before the day passes and a curse will consume him for good. Shrek
    gets to have some action with a horde of witches and must face the
    dragon once again. I could not say that the action was impressive but
    it has its little cool moments. I particularly loved the chain skull
    weapons that the witches use.

    In addition, this movie works also as a family domestic drama where it
    maturely deals with the simple family issue of boredom and being sick
    of how repetitious family life can be. I daresay that the film can work
    as a satire or perhaps a metaphor that some married men can learn from.
    There is one sequence in the movie that does capture this crisis; I am
    talking about the scenes where we see Shrek realize that despite the
    fact that he does live a happy life, it can get pretty dull and
    annoying at times, but then again that's life.

    Perhaps it becomes boring because many of us choose not to grow up;
    many of us choose to not let go of what our past lives were. That is
    what happens to Shrek in this movie. To escape the mediocrity of a
    family life, he wishes to relive the moments when he was still just a
    normal ogre again. And because of this, he puts his family life in
    jeopardy. Shrek 4's tale comes full circle in the sense that it
    questions if Shrek did have a "happily ever after" ending in the past
    three movies, and puts one last fantastic circumstance to let him live
    out a reality that this never happened.

    And lastly, Shrek 4's main potential lies in its romance. With an
    alternate reality story, Shrek faces a Fiona that has never met him.
    Therefore, Shrek must find out some way to make Fiona fall in love with
    him all over again. If you ask me, the romantic aspect of this movie is
    as innovative as the first Shrek movie, in ways that it tells mature
    subject matter in the guise of fantasy. The Fiona of the alternate
    reality mirrors the plight of women who gave up on romance, and one
    scene certainly negates the falsity of most fairy tales with a line
    that goes something like: "a mere kiss does not solve everything" It
    negates other fantasies like "Sleeping Beauty" or "Snow White" because
    it destroys the superficial aspect of those obsolete fairy tales with a
    more realistic approach, because indeed, a kiss is nothing if there is
    no true love that goes with it. In my opinion, Shrek 4 succeeds in this
    aspect.

    Shrek may not be the best movie this summer, or it might not be the
    funniest Shrek movie, but it certainly is one that is very rich
    story-wise. Just as his line in the first movie went "I have layers"
    and there certainly are deeper layers to this story rather than one
    that will just make you laugh. Of course, this works out as a great
    family movie, but it is certainly perfect for couples, most especially
    married couples, and parents alike. I give SHREK FOREVER AFTER a.k.a.
    SHREK: THE FINAL CHAPTER a Matinée rating for single serving; and a
    Full Price rating for family servings.

  4. On the day that Shrek rescued the cursed Princess Fiona from the tower
    where she was kept prisoner of the dragon, her parents King Harold and
    the Queen were ready to sign a contract with the cunning
    Rumpelstiltskin delivering the kingdom Far Far Away to him. On the
    present days, Shrek feels bored with Fiona, his family and friends and
    near a breakdown, and he misses the years when he was a terrifying
    ogre. Rumpelstiltskin overhears a discussion between Shrek and Fiona
    and meets Shrek, offering a deal to make he feels a frightening ogre
    again. In return, Shrek should deliver one day of his childhood to
    Rumpelstiltskin. Shrek is lured and Far Far Away is distorted under the
    reign of the tricky Rumpelstiltskin. Now Shrek misses his family and
    friends and has to win Fiona's heart again to save Far Far Away, his
    friends and himself.

    I have just watched "Shrek Forever After" and my expectations were very
    low, based on the IMDb user's rating and a couple of reviews that I had
    glanced. However I liked this underrated animation a lot, which has a
    good story with many hilarious moments. Once again, Donkey "steals the
    movie" and this character has been for years the best role of the
    wasted Eddy Murphy. My vote is eight.

    Title (Brazil): "Shrek para Sempre" ("Shrek Forever After")

  5. Shrek Forever After (and yes, that's the official title as seen in the
    first real shot of the film) is a welcome return to form after the
    disappointment of Shrek The Third, which LOOKED beautiful but hit all
    the wrong notes. This one has recaptured the fun of the franchise while
    potentially being the darkest one in terms of plot. Alternate universe
    stories have been done to death, but the appealing nature of so many of
    the characters makes this one work, as well as the fact that the
    filmmakers are clearly trying to wrap up the story (which includes a
    small bit of retconning at the beginning, but it pays off toward the
    end). The 3D occasionally falls into the trap of throwing things
    towards the audience, but the characters and sets are so beautifully
    animated in all dimensions (the textures of Shrek and Donkey,
    particularly, have improved even on the wonder that was Kung Fu Panda)
    that the 3D actually adds to the enjoyment. The first two remain the
    crown jewels of the franchise, but this is a worthy addition and a
    suitable end to the… well, saga is too strong a word, so storyline
    will have to do. And the bonus? Eddie Murphy gets to sing SEVERAL songs
    WITHIN the movie!

  6. It's not really cool to like Dreamworks Animation anymore. Sure,
    they're not Pixar. Sure, they're too hung up on star power and pop
    culture references. But I've still enjoyed the majority their films
    more than I have a lot of what's out there. And I love the first two
    "Shrek" movies. Their funny, entertaining, terrifically animated, and,
    too me, some of the best animated love stories that have been made.
    Most fairy tale romances perpetuate the idea that love is for beautiful
    people (even the masterpiece "Beauty and the Beast" has it's cake and
    eats it too on this point), and Princes and Princesses are better than
    common people. "Shrek"'s idea of finding happiness in who you are was
    much more palatable to me. i found the first film a delight, and the
    second even better.

    But the third was only okay. The humor wasn't nearly as clever or
    funny, and the heart just wasn't there like it used to be. "Shrek
    Forever After" isn't as good as those first two. But it's a big step
    back in the right direction.

    The story begins with Shrek getting used to being a father. He loves
    Fiona and the kids, but he misses his old life as a menacing ogre. He's
    seen more as a lovable tourist attraction now, and he doesn't like it.
    So, he makes a deal with the mysterious Rumpletiltskin (surprisingly
    NOT voiced by a name actor) to get one day back in his old life. In
    exchange, he gives up one day from his past. A day from his childhood
    that he doesn't even remember.

    Unfortuntaely, that day turns out to be the day he was born, and this
    leads to an "It's a Wonderful Life" scenario where Shrek doesn't know
    Fiona, Donkey, Puss-in-Boots, or any of his friends, and
    Rumplestiltskin rules the Kingdom with a tiny iron fist. The resulting
    story is a great deal of fun, with Fiona now a warrior leading an ogre
    rebellion, the Gingerbread Man fighting as a gladiator against Animal
    Crackers, and so forth. The humor isn't back to it's highest heights,
    but there are a good number of genuine laughs. And the heart is back
    bigtime. I found "Shrek Forever After" surprisingly touching..

    Okay, it's not as good as "Toy Story 3" is likely to be, nor is it as
    good as "How to train your Dragon". but I had a blast with "Shrek
    Forver After" and can't wait to take my niece and nephew

  7. Well it was bound to happen, most animation saga's or trilogy's end
    eventually and some better than others. With Shrek Forever After this
    is the case, still packed full of gags, funny moments and hilarious one
    liners its a good end to a fun enjoyable franchise. We all hoped it
    would also end this way, in a positive way as the last 11 years has
    been Shrek sequels some better than others. With this final adventure,
    old characters are reunited and new ones enter the fray.

    Plus we also get a fresh new setting for this latest and final tale,
    some good dialogue too and of course improved animation. Considering
    this was always gonna go up against Toy Story 3, we knew it would be a
    close fight for the throne of the summer blockbuster. Otherwise,
    however Shrek Forever After has done a good job of grabbing it for me
    until I see Toy Story 3, until then I believe this is the best
    animation summer blockbuster of the year.

    If you want quick gags, laughs and family fun Shrek Forever After is
    for you and also for fans of the franchise.

  8. Almost a decade ago, the film Shrek left many people amazed (including
    me) with its extraordinary animation and a hilarious parody of some
    famous fairy-tales (specially the Disney interpretations of them),
    without neglecting the creation of memorable characters and honest
    emotions.Shrek 2 was also excellent, but it was a bit below the level
    from the first film.Then, in 2007, Shrek the Third was a desperate
    attempt to have the magic from the first two films; the result was
    mediocre, and a big declination from the first two films.Now, we have
    Shrek Forever After, and even though it is far from reaching the level
    from Shrek 1 and 2, it kept me entertained, and I think it represents
    an improvement on the third film.

    What I mostly liked from Shrek Forever After is that screenwriters Josh
    Klausner and Darren Lemke followed the evolution from Shrek in a
    natural way.In the first film, we saw the change in Shrek's life when
    he first fell in love; in the second one, he had to face the
    responsibilities from adult life; in the third one, he faced the
    insecurities of the paternity; and now, the ogre feels overwhelmed by
    the family routine and he misses the liberty from his youth, which is a
    subject that is a bit more mature to what we are accustomed to see on
    an animated film.

    However, I found various fails in Shrek Forever After, specially in the
    fact that the screenplay is not very ingenious.Its handling of the
    humor keeps being based on songs, characters and events from popular
    culture, but that does not feel as fresh and irreverent as it had felt
    on the first Shrek; in fact it feels a bit tiring now, because of the
    large number of animated films which have used that strategy.However,
    there are good moments of humor in the interaction between the
    characters; I particularly liked the character of Puss in Boots; most
    of the laughs I had while watching this movie came from that
    character.Good work, Antonio Banderas.Unfortunately, I cannot say the
    same about Eddie Murphy, one of my favorite comedians, whose
    contribution to the other movies had been among the best elements from
    them.However, I felt his voice acting in Shrek Forever After to be
    forced and listless.The rest of the cast made a decent work, but nobody
    particularly stood out.

    But the whole experience from Shrek Forever After is not highly
    memorable, and one of the best things I can say about it is that it
    avoided to fall into some irritating mistakes from the third film (even
    though that does not exempt it to have its own fails).However, I think
    I can recommend Shrek Forever After because it kept me
    entertained…however, it is very far away from reaching the magic from
    the first two films.

  9. It's not really cool to like Dreamworks Animation anymore. Sure,
    they're not Pixar. Sure, they're too hung up on star power and pop
    culture references. But I've still enjoyed the majority their films
    more than I have a lot of what's out there. And I love the first two
    "Shrek" movies. Their funny, entertaining, terrifically animated, and,
    too me, some of the best animated love stories that have been made.
    Most fairy tale romances perpetuate the idea that love is for beautiful
    people (even the masterpiece "Beauty and the Beast" has it's cake and
    eats it too on this point), and Princes and Princesses are better than
    common people. "Shrek"'s idea of finding happiness in who you are was
    much more palatable to me. i found the first film a delight, and the
    second even better.

    But the third was only okay. The humor wasn't nearly as clever or
    funny, and the heart just wasn't there like it used to be. "Shrek
    Forever After" isn't as good as those first two. But it's a big step
    back in the right direction.

    The story begins with Shrek getting used to being a father. He loves
    Fiona and the kids, but he misses his old life as a menacing ogre. He's
    seen more as a lovable tourist attraction now, and he doesn't like it.
    So, he makes a deal with the mysterious Rumpletiltskin (surprisingly
    NOT voiced by a name actor) to get one day back in his old life. In
    exchange, he gives up one day from his past. A day from his childhood
    that he doesn't even remember.

    Unfortuntaely, that day turns out to be the day he was born, and this
    leads to an "It's a Wonderful Life" scenario where Shrek doesn't know
    Fiona, Donkey, Puss-in-Boots, or any of his friends, and
    Rumplestiltskin rules the Kingdom with a tiny iron fist. The resulting
    story is a great deal of fun, with Fiona now a warrior leading an ogre
    rebellion, the Gingerbread Man fighting as a gladiator against Animal
    Crackers, and so forth. The humor isn't back to it's highest heights,
    but there are a good number of genuine laughs. And the heart is back
    bigtime. I found "Shrek Forever After" surprisingly touching..

    Okay, it's not as good as "Toy Story 3" is likely to be, nor is it as
    good as "How to train your Dragon". but I had a blast with "Shrek
    Forver After" Evren Buyruk

  10. Shrek has gone down a cult film character… so has Donkey, Fiona and
    Puss in Boots, thanks to the film that these characters became such a
    craze. Shrek was awesome, Sherk 2 was legendary, but the last one
    before this one 'Shrek The Third' was a yawn. Now comes 'Shrek Forever
    After', which ends the Shrek series… well if there is one more left,
    then I guess I won't be looking forward to it!

    The problem with 'Shrek The Third' and 'Shrek Forever After' are it's
    script. The writing is bland, you except a lot from Shrek, due to the
    wholesome entertainment we've witnessed before. The Final Chapter has
    it's share of funny and light moments, but they are far and between!

    What saves this disappointment is it's characters. Myers as Shrek is as
    good as ever! Diaz gives Fiona the voice she needs. Donkey and Puss-In
    Boots voiced by Icons like Murphy and Banderas are the life of the
    show. They are funny and spot-on. Walt Dohrn as the evil-head
    Rumplestilskin is just about okay.

    All n all, It's truly time to say Shrek and his friends Good-Bye.
    Thanks for the entertainment you gave us in the first 2 flicks, now you
    guys are getting wasted in poor scripts. So, Have a nice time at Far
    Far Away!

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